Allergies and Hematologic Cancer Risk: Is There a Link?

young white woman blowing nose allergy

Women with airborne allergies could be at higher risk for hematologic malignancies than women without allergies, researchers contend.

The Study: Data from a prospective cohort study of more than 66000 older adults in Washington state (USA) found that women with any airborne allergen had a 1.47x increase in risk for a hematologic cancer. In addition, women who hit the allergy trifecta of sensitivity to plants, grass, and trees had a 73% greater chance of developing a mature B-cell lymphoma or related disorder.

Overall, men were more likely than women to develop a hematologic malignancy, but the risk in men was not significantly associated with allergic status, write Mazyar Shadman, MD, MPH, and colleagues from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

“For other cancers, the idea long ago was that if you have allergies, your immune system is kind of hyperactive, and that should lower your risk for other cancers,” he explained. However, he added, “for hematologic cancers, you could go either way, because immune surveillance would be good but, if you have allergies, that means that cells are dividing more to mount the immune response, increasing the chance of mutations,” offers Richard G. Stevens, PhD, professor of cancer epidemiology at the University of Connecticut Health Center.

My Take: While allergies may increase the risk of cancer of the blood/lymph system, it may lower the risk of other cancers, including of the head and neck. Although the study was large and had comprehensive baseline data, it was limited by its reliance on self-reporting of allergies and by the inclusion of data only on current allergies, rather than allergic history. I’m Dr. Michael Hunter.

The small print: The material presented herein is informational only, and is not designed to provide specific guidance for an individual. Please check with a valued health care provider with any questions or concerns. As for me, I am a Harvard- , Yale- and UPenn-educated radiation oncologist, and I practice in the Seattle, WA (USA) area. I feel genuinely privileged to be able to share with you. If you enjoyed today’s offering, please consider clicking the follow button at the bottom of this page.

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Reference: Am J Hematol. 2013;88:1050-1054. Abstract

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understandcancerin60minutes

Harvard AB Yale MD UPenn Radiation Oncology Radiation Oncologist, Seattle area

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