Fiber and Colon Health

colon cancer barium enema abdomen X-ray bowels

Scientists have more reasons for you to eat fiber and not abuse antibiotics. They’ve shown that a receptor doctors already activate with mega-doses of niacin to protect patients’ cardiovascular systems also plays a key role in preventing colon inflammation and cancer, according to a study featured on the cover of the journal Immunity.

Why This Is Important: The finding helps explain why a high-fiber diet reduces the risk of colon problems and indicates that when fiber is lacking, niacin, or vitamin B3, just may help keep the colon healthy as well, said Dr. Vadivel Ganapathy, Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and a corresponding study author.

Details, details: Mice lacking the receptor, Gpr109a, were prone to inflammation and cancer of the colon, And, when they gave niacin to mice whose healthy colonic bacteria had been wiped out by antibiotics – a frequent occurrence in chronic antibiotic use – it helped steer immune cells in the colon into a safe, anti-inflammatory mode.

Good bacteria in the colon thrive on fiber and its digestion produces butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, which the researchers discovered years before naturally activates Gpr109a. However this relationship appears limited to the colon, where butyrate levels can soar in the face of a high-fiber diet. GlaxoSmithKline and the University of Heidelberg, Germany showed in 2003 that Gpr109a receptors on the surface of fat cells mediate the protective cardiovascular effect of niacin, including increasing good cholesterol, or HDL, while decreasing levels of disease-producing LDL. Their search for other activators identified butyrate, which led the current study’s authors to find that not only is the Gpr109a receptor expressed on the surface of colon cells, but that with sufficient fiber intake, butyrate levels in the colon can activate it.

This study shows that activation of Gpr109a in the colon by butyrate prompts immune cells, which are in ample supply in that region, to suppress rather than promote inflammation, a factor in a number of painful conditions such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and colorectal cancer.

Once butyrate activates the Gpr109a receptor on dendritic cells and macrophages in the colon, these immune cells start producing anti-inflammatory molecules and sending messages to the T cells, key orchestrators of immunity, to do the same. Butyrate also prompts epithelial cells that line the colon to produce cytokines, which aid wound-healing, a critical step for resolving the intestinal inflammation that occurs in ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s.

“To protect your colon, you need this receptor, as well as the fiber and butyrate which activate it,” Ganapathy said. For people who won’t or can’t eat high-fiber diets, mega-doses of niacin, may help protect the colon, the way it’s already protecting hearts, the scientists suggest.

I’m Dr. Michael Hunter. Don’t forget that dietary fiber!

The small print: The material presented herein is informational only, and is not designed to provide specific guidance for an individual. Please check with a valued health care provider with any questions or concerns. As for me, I am a Harvard- , Yale- and UPenn-educated radiation oncologist, and I practice in the Seattle, WA (USA) area. I feel genuinely privileged to be able to share with you. If you enjoyed today’s offering, please consider clicking the follow button at the bottom of this page.

Available now: Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Both can be found at the Apple Ibooks store. Coming Soon for iPad:  Understand Breast Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minute; Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Thank you.

Reference: Nagendra Singh, Ashish Gurav, Sathish Sivaprakasam, Evan Brady, Ravi Padia, Huidong Shi, Muthusamy Thangaraju, Puttur D. Prasad, Santhakumar Manicassamy, David H. Munn, Jeffrey R. Lee, Stefan Offermanns, Vadivel Ganapathy.Activation of Gpr109a, Receptor for Niacin and the Commensal Metabolite Butyrate, Suppresses Colonic Inflammation and CarcinogenesisImmunity, 2014; DOI:10.1016/j.immuni.2013.12.007

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