Different Brain Tumors Have the Same Origin

What You Need to Know: Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumors. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. Now researchers at Uppsala University, together with American colleagues, have shown that one and the same cell of origin can give rise to different types of glioma. This is important for the basic understanding of how these tumors are formed and can contribute to the development of more efficient and specific glioma therapies.

The most common primary, malignant brain tumors in adults, called glioma, are formed from cells in the brain that are not nerve cells. These are serious tumors that lack highly effective treatment, and relapses are common. There are different types of glioma, classified according to an established system based on which cell type the tumor arises from. The most common gliomas are astrocytoma, which have their name from astrocytes, and oligodendroglioma, which are believed to arise from oligodendrocytes. Patients with astrocytoma have a poorer prognosis than oligodendroglioma patients, and the two tumor types are considered separate clinical diagnoses.

“Since the tumor types look different and have different prognoses it has been assumed that they arise from different cells of origin in the brain, but the fact is that the exact cell of origin has not been determined for any glioma. We have for a long time been interested in finding out more about the origin of gliomas and how it is associated with the genetic alterations that cause the tumor,” says lead researcher Lene Uhrbom.

In collaboration with colleagues in the United States, Uhrbom’s research group has studied glioma development in mice. Using tumor models for both astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma, which are very similar to human tumors, they showed that one and the same cell type, called oligodendrocyte precursor cells, could give rise to both tumor forms.

The researchers discovered that it is not the cell of origin but rather the genetic aberrations that control which tumor type is formed. By analysing gene activity in a large number of human astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma they could also conclude that the tumors are more similar to one another than was previously believed. This supports their finding that the glioma diagnoses can have the same origin.

“We saw that the same kind of more differentiated cell of origin, which has previously only been shown to give rise to oligodendroglioma, also can give rise to astrocytoma. New findings such as these increase our understanding of the basic mechanisms that cause glioma,” says Lene Uhrbom.

I’m Dr. Michael Hunter.

The small print: The material presented herein is informational only, and is not designed to provide specific guidance for an individual. Please check with a valued health care provider with any questions or concerns. As for me, I am a Harvard- , Yale- and UPenn-educated radiation oncologist, and I practice in the Seattle, WA (USA) area. I feel genuinely privileged to be able to share with you. If you enjoyed today’s offering, please consider clicking the follow button at the bottom of this page.

Available now: Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Both can be found at the Apple Ibooks store. Coming Soon for iPad: Understand Breast Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minute; Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Thank you.

Reference: Uppsala University. “Different brain tumors have the same origin, new findings show.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141028214055.htm>.

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understandcancerin60minutes

Harvard AB Yale MD UPenn Radiation Oncology Radiation Oncologist, Seattle area

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