Drop That Cookie: Sweet, Starchy Foods May Be Linked to Uterus Cancer

obese fat woman

The Bottom Line: Sweet, starchy foods like sugar and white bread probably are linked to endometrial cancer, while coffee probably protects against it, researchers reported on this week. But obesity is probably the #1 causative agent. These are the conclusions of the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund International.

The Study: The two organizations assigned an international panel of experts to review the evidence in what’s called a meta-analysis (study of studies) for what might cause various cancers. The group, which tends to focus on the links between diet, exercise and cancer, chose endometrial (uterus) cancer for the latest review.

My Take: Women who are obese have two to three times the rate of endometrial cancer. People who are more active regularly tend to have a decreased rate of endometrial cancer. the team also found some surprising findings – the degree to which coffee can protect against the cancer, and the rates at which sugary, starchy foods increase it. So, coffee in moderation is probably not a bad idea. And watch the weight!

One of the authors is spot on when she observes: “The bottom line is you want to eat whole grains instead of refined grains and sugary foods,” She adds “all the findings are really pointing to the same thing – maintaining better glucose metabolism and maintaining a healthy body weight,” she added. “That means a healthy diet and regular exercise.” That these also help reduce the risk of many, many cancers is an added bonus. Enjoy that brisk walk today!

Reference: http://www.aicr.org/assets/docs/pdf/reports/2013-cup-endometrial-cancer.pdf

The small print: The material presented herein is informational only, and is not designed to provide specific guidance for an individual. Please check with a valued health care provider with any questions or concerns. As for me, I am a Harvard- , Yale- and UPenn-educated radiation oncologist, and I practice in the Seattle, WA (USA) area. I feel genuinely privileged to be able to share with you. If you enjoyed today’s offering, please consider clicking the follow button at the bottom of this page.

Available now: Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Both can be found at the Apple Ibooks store. Coming Soon for iPad:  Understand Breast Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minuteable now: Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Thank you.

Hot flashes: Risk Factors

Mature woman white smiling

Over the next several issues, I’ll turn to hot flashes: What are the risk factors, what is the pathophysiology, and management. Today, we begin with factors associated with hot flashes for patients with or without cancer.

Risk Factors: Both men and women can get hot flashes due to hormonal changes that occur during the natural aging process, although hot flashes are more common among midlife women. Age, race, ethnicity, educational level (equivocal), smoking, genetics, and body mass index can play roles. Some of  my patients see exacerbations with alcohol, exposure to heat, stress, spicy foods, and caffeine.

Race: Some studies point to African Americans having a greater risk for hot flashes (in addition to greater severity) as compared to other races. Here are the results from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation for combined hot flash and night sweat prevalence: Japanese 18%; Chinese-Americans 21%; whites 31%; Latinas 21%, and blacks 46%.

Smoking: The few studies that address the issue suggest a link between smoking and hot flashes. Smoking can alter estrogen metabolism in at least 4 ways.

Heart: Women who have hot flashes for 6 days or more over 2 weeks (especially those who are overweight or obese) have a higher cardiovascular risk. The role of weight and body mass index is less clear.

Genes: Research into the link between genetics (estrogen metabolism and receptor genes) and hot flashes appears promising. For example, women with a change (polymorphism) in a gene spot called CYP1B1 are at a 1/3 greater risk of reporting more severe and persistent hot flashes.

Cancer-related risk factors: These are predominantly related to the rapidity of hormone withdrawal. Among women, this is most commonly a drop in internal estrogen levels; with men, it is a drop in testosterone. For women, this may be linked to stopping hormone replacement therapy (HRT) when hormone-dependent breast cancer is diagnosed, the start of anti-estrogen therapies for treatment, chemotherapy-induced disruption of ovarian function, or damage to the ovaries (for example removal or radiation). Younger women are less likely than midlife women to have menopause induced by chemotherapy. In men, hot flashes are most commonly associated with anti-testosterone treatments for prostate cancer.

Certain cancers can be due to secretion of hormones by the cancer itself. Examples include some carcinoid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer.

I’m Dr. Michael Hunter. In my next blog, I’ll look at the physiology of hot flashes: Why do they occur?

The small print: The material presented herein is informational only, and is not designed to provide specific guidance for an individual. Please check with a valued health care provider with any questions or concerns. As for me, I am a Harvard- , Yale- and UPenn-educated radiation oncologist, and I practice in the Seattle, WA (USA) area. I feel genuinely privileged to be able to share with you. If you enjoyed today’s offering, please consider clicking the follow button at the bottom of this page.

Coming Soon for iPad  Understand Breast Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes. Available now: Understand Colon Cancer in 60 Minutes; Understand Brain Glioma in 60 Minutes. Both can be found at the Apple Ibooks store. Thank you.

Pregnancy after a breast cancer diagnosis does not affect prognosis

pregnant woman

Young women who have completed treatment for invasive breast cancer often ask if a pregnancy will increase their chances of recurrence (cancer return). The question seems appropriate to me, especially given the fact that hormon receptor positive breast cancer is fueled by estrogen. It should be comforting to these women that a new study suggests that a pregnancy after treatment for early stage, estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer does not affect the recurrence rate (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2013;31:73-79). Researchers in Brussels, Belgium aimed to compared the disease free survival (DFS) in pateitns with ER-positive breast cancer both with and without a subsequent pregnancy.  The authors also looked at a number of other outcomes, including disease free survival among ER-negative patients.

The retrospective review found no difference in DFS between the pregnancy and non-pregnancy groups in the ER-positive group. Perhaps surprisingly, the patients who became pregnant less than 2 years after diagnosis had a better disease free survival compared to their matched controls. This last observation may be due to selection bias, I think. The bottom line? This study provides good evidence that a woman who desires a biological child after breast cancer diagnosis will not have their prognosis adversely affected by pregnancy. The study is not without flaws however, including the fact that 80% of patients had no information about a critical marker known as HER-2.

A big question is what to do if you want to become pregnant, but have not completed a recommended course of anti-estrogen therapy such as tamoxifen. Researchers are beginning to investigate the impact of a break from tamoxifen on results. I hope you have found this blog informative, and look forward to offering an e-book on breast cancer (for IPad) within weeks. I’m Dr. Michael Hunter, and I thank you for visiting with me.